• consumer proposal,  covid-19,  personal bankruptcy

    CERB overpayments can be discharged in a bankruptcy or consumer proposal

    The following is a Guidance to Licensed Insolvency Trustees dated March 25th 2022 from the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy’s website: The Government of Canada is beginning to recover Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) where it has been determined that it was paid erroneously or was an overpayment. The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) is confirming to Licensed Insolvency Trustees (LIT) that erroneous or overpayment of CERB are provable claims in bankruptcy. Erroneous or overpayment of CERB is a releasable debt in the event of an insolvency given that it is to be treated as a debt owed to the Crown pursuant to subsection 12(2) of the…

  • covid-19,  personal bankruptcy

    Urgent Info: How Bankruptcy Affects Your COVID-19 Benefits From The Government Of Canada

    We have been receiving inquiries from people: who are either contemplating bankruptcy or have already filed bankruptcy and haven’t yet been discharged; and are concerned about the impact bankruptcy will have on the various benefit programs that were introduced under the COVID-19 Emergency Response Act. What follows is an e-mail issued to all Licensed Insolvency Trustees earlier today from the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy. This should give you some guidance on how your bankruptcy will affect your benefits under the various programs. Note: “OSB” is an acronym for the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy ——————————————————————————————————————– Guidance re: COVID-19 Emergency Response Act The Government of Canada has introduced the COVID-19 Emergency…

  • economics,  budgeting,  consumer proposal,  investing,  personal bankruptcy,  personal finance

    Preparing for the Next Recession – A Guide For The Canadian Middle Class

    As a CPA and Licensed Insolvency Trustee, I had a front row seat during the Great Recession of 2009 – 2011. I saw the devastating impact it had on the lives of ordinary Canadians. These were everyday people who were for the most part honest, hard working, and played by the rules. Yet they found themselves on the short end of the stick when the Great Recession started 10 years ago: some lost their jobs, some had their financial portfolios decimated, some lost their homes and quite a few experienced losing all three. It’s been over 10 years since the onset of the Great Recession and Canadians are more indebted…

  • credit,  credit cards,  personal finance

    How Does a Credit Score in Canada Really Work?

    Introduction In theory, a credit score should be quite simple – through an algorithm, you’re assigned a numerical score that determines your credit worthiness. The score is a weighted average of many factors, including but not limited to: Your payment history Your credit utilization rate, which is how much of your credit limit you have uses versus how much you have available to you Balance owing on your debts The length of your credit history Public records (such as bankruptcy) Number of inquiries into your credit file Different Credit Scores But the reality is not that simple. Here are the complicating factors: Each of the two major credit rating agencies,…

  • personal finance,  personal bankruptcy,  student loans

    Filing bankruptcy with gambling and substance abuse problems

    A readers asks First and foremost I’m a gambling addict and also have problems with substance abuse. I have accumulated so much debt that I have fallen into a deep depression and I just beat myself up daily because I did it to myself. My debts: $3,000 of credit card debt, $11,000 line of credit, $11,000 in payday loans (the worst I know). I pay around $380 a month just on interest charges; pretty much my debts are not going away. I have personal loans from friends of $6.500 and a student loan of $5,000 – I haven’t made a payment since around 2008. I also have a payday loan…

  • consumer proposal

    Meeting of Creditors Requested for Consumer Proposal

    A reader asks: I filed a consumer proposal back in August and a meeting was just called with my creditors. I only have BMO (majority holder) and RBC to deal with. They rejected my first offer and we are counter-proposing with another amount. I feel like we should just accept the amount that they want at this point. But I know that I am being helped so I pay the least in the end. I don’t want the proposal to be rejected. It sounds like it’s only a difference of $50 from what I could gather. How likely is it to be rejected? Or does this meeting just serve as…

  • consumer proposal

    I’m Behind in My Consumer Proposal Payments!

    A reader asks I filed a Consumer Proposal back in April where I’ve been paying $175 biweekly. However, I ended up losing my job back in July and the payments after that were coming out of my savings. I am now down to the last $100 to my name, literally. The next $175 payment is scheduled to be paid in a week’s time, and needless to say, that ain’t going to happen thanks to my broke ass. I filed for Employment Insurance yesterday (I’m stupid and don’t know why I didn’t think of doing it sooner), so there is a possibility it may be approved and I’d get some funds…

  • real estate,  personal bankruptcy

    Transferring a Home Before Bankruptcy

    A reader asks: My father fell critically ill earlier this year. As a result, he is unable to pay his credit cards as he is not working. The bills are very large. He has no financial assets other than his a commercial property (owned outright). What options does he have? In relation, can the property be sold to my brother and/or proceeds transferred to him (inheritance), then my father proceed to file bankruptcy without repercussions? Here is a breakdown of his finances: $1.2m – commercial property – owned outright Approx 60-80k in credit card debt only Zero income stream from any source, sadly. My father is not a future planner.…

  • personal finance

    The Relationship Between Personality Traits and Financial Success

    During my 20 years as a financial professional and business owner in Toronto, I’ve gotten to know some very successful people and not so successful people. Here are my observations about the former and the latter within the framework of the Big Five Personality Traits, namely (1) Agreeableness; (2) Conscientiousness; (3) Extraversion; (4) Neuroticism; and (5) Openness to Experience. Agreeableness: “Nice guys finish last” – in my experience, this saying is very true. The “difficult person” is usually going to come out ahead financially because he can negotiate more aggressively in his own best interest, be it a real estate deal, salary negotiation or business deal. He won’t be overly concerned…

  • personal bankruptcy,  credit cards,  income tax

    20 Year Old Considering Personal Bankruptcy

    A reader asks: I messed up big time but I’ve learned a lot of lessons. I earned just a hair shy of $200,000 in my first year as a real estate agent at 20 years old. I was way too immature to have that kind of money, and blew most of it without saving. I invested my tax savings in growing my team which I thought would have been an easy pay back. Lost it all. No worries though just sell more houses. Depression strikes, mother gets very sick, I took on an expensive apartment and car. Not emotionally mature enough to handle these things like an adult yet. Hemorrhaging…